The OIG Report on WGU, Part 2: React…But Don’t Overreact

Word cloud with words: Hysterics, panic button, have a fit, alrm, sare, panic, lost it, go to pieces" written several times.

It has been more than a week since the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued its Final Audit Report declaring that “Western Governors University Was Not Eligible to Participate in the Title IV Programs.” Both of us (Russ Poulin, WCET and Van Davis, Blackboard) have been following the activities surrounding the […]

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On the OIG/WGU Finding, Part 1: When Interaction Is Not Interaction

Yesterday, the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) issued a report concluding: “We concluded that Western Governors University did not comply with the institutional eligibility requirement that limits the percentage of regular students who may enroll in correspondence courses. Therefore, the Department should require the school to return the $712,670,616 in Title […]

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System(s) for CBE Readiness: Enabling Student Affordability and Success

Competency Based Education allows students to advance toward a completion goal based on their mastery of a skill or competency at their own pace. Establishing a CBE program can seem like a daunting task,  but, luckily, this post contains some help! This week on WCET Frontiers we have a wonderful post from Carlos Rivers. Carlos […]

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Interpreting what is Required for “Regular and Substantive Interaction”

As greater numbers of students move into online and competency-based education programs, we have seen new interest in understanding the Department of Education’s regulations. In particular, faculty and administrators seek to understand how the Department interprets rules requiring courses to include “regular and substantive interaction,” especially in distance and competency-based education. Those of us in […]

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Why We Need to Stop Using ‘Self-Paced’ in CBE Descriptions

Myk Garn is a long-time friend of WCET. He currently champions “new learning models” for the University System of Georgia. Myk also serves on the Board of Directors for the Competency-Based Education Network (C-BEN). After recent discussions about attacks on the CBE model (see last week’s Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General’s criticism on […]

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21st Century Credentials: Telling the Story of the Whole Student

Earlier this month WCET’ers gathered in Salt Lake City to have frank discussions and hear from leading experts in the somewhat nebulous construct of 21st Century Credentials. There is no way I can replicate the conversations held, the discussions, the debate in a blog post. But I can distill some of the themes and learning […]

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One Graduate’s Elusive Achievement: Thanks to Competency-Based Education

Learn how competency-based education (CBE) helped one Texan (an adult, veteran, fully-employed, grandparent) achieve another important title: college graduate. Thank you to Judith Sebesta, Institute for Competency-Based Education, Texas A&M University-Commerce for contributing this inspiring story. Russ Poulin In his harangue against the complexities of “modern,” early-twentieth century American society, The Simple Life, Charles Wagner […]

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Edtech is a Human Experience: My First SXSWedu

Sometimes you have to start at the end to see the beginning more clearly.  On my {somewhat delayed} journey home from SXSWedu, our Mike Abbiatti posed the question, “if technology is all it’s cracked up to be, why do we spend so much time in airplanes and hotels?”   For me this is a simple answer. We’re […]

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Connected Credentials and the Value of Competencies

We’re happy to welcome Deb Everhart, Georgetown University, back to the Frontiers blog.  Today Deb is sharing work she did with ACE on connected credentials and the value of competencies.  Our own Mike Abbiatti worked on this with her and we are so excited to share the story with you.  Also, don’t miss our April […]

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Emergence of the Linked Services Sector in American Higher Ed & Lifelong Learning

By now, it borders on trite to declare that American higher education, and, in fact, global higher education stands on the precipice of dynamic, revolutionary, and disruptive change. But the cards that I see being dealt as we enter 2016 indicate that the fracturing of higher education’s dominant model will not only continue, but accelerate. […]

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