Category Archives: student success

Comparing Credentials: An Update on the Credential Engine

What does the “higher education of the future” look like? Will it be online? On campus? Virtual? Will we still have the same 4 – 7 year undergraduate degree programs? Or will alternative credentials change the higher education landscape? This future seems a bit complex! Luckily, today we’re joined by Carrie Samson, Communications Manager for […]

Shifting Campus Culture through Mentoring

Today’s post is an important example of how a campus culture can impact student success. WCET is happy to share this post from Sarah Torres Lugo, Research Assistant with NCHEMS and the Foundation for Student Success. Sarah is here to discuss a Foundation for Student Success project which connects model (mentor) institutions with other institutions […]

Rio Salado: Innovation Pushes the Boundaries of Tradition

Today here on WCET Frontiers we are happy to welcome Stacey VanderHeiden Güney, the Director of the Digital Learning Solution Network. Stacey is here to discuss a recent study on higher education institutions implementing digital learning and follow-up conversations regarding one of the institutions included in the study.  Thank you to Stacey for today’s post […]

Opening a New Path to Success – A Journey with Open Textbooks

Z Degrees (Zero-Textbook Cost Degrees) are what many consider the holy grail of Open Educational Resources (OER) accomplishments. Today’s guest blogger, Tanya Grosz, Ph. D., Dean of Graduate, Online & Adult Learning, led the open initiative at the University of Northwestern St. Paul—the first institution in Minnesota to create a Z Degree. Tanya and I […]

WCET Summit: Ensuring Ethical and Equitable Access in Digital Learning

In June 2017, I had the outstanding opportunity to attend my first WCET Leadership Summit. Last year’s event focused on the essential institutional capacities needed to encourage and lead innovation. I specifically remember feeling so invigorated by every session I attended and I truly enjoyed the hallway conversations and the incredibly active social media backchannel. […]

State Authorization for Distance Ed Federal Regulation to be Implemented 07/01/2018

Frequently Asked Questions: Overview and Direction of the Regulations The U.S. Department of Education is scheduled to implement state authorization for distance education regulations on July 1, 2018. There is still some uncertainty about whether the Department will implement the regulation and, if they do, what institutions need to do to comply. WCET and its […]

Count All Students! Outcome Measures for Community Colleges

Should we count all students when analyzing higher education, or only some of them? We think all students should be included….and community colleges are often misrepresented by not doing so. This third post in a series of posts on the IPEDS Outcome Measures data (released by the U.S. Department of Education late in 2017), we […]

Count All Students! Outcome Measures for Non-Traditional Institutions

Should we count all students when analyzing higher education, or only some of them? It’s not surprising that when you include all students, you get different results from that analysis than when you don’t. We think all students should be included. As reported in our last blog post (“Count All Students! New Outcome Measures Now […]

Count All Students! New Outcome Measures Now Include Non-Traditional Students

There is new improvement to the U.S. Department of Education’s Graduation Rate statistic. And we should all be using it. Institutions with large non-traditional student enrollments (e.g.: community colleges, online colleges, inner city universities, military-serving institutions) have not been well-represented by the Department’s Graduation Rate statistic. Few of their students are included in the results […]

Rigor, Meet Reality

How do you define academic rigor? I know when I was completing my undergraduate and graduate coursework, I could tell the difference between a rigorous course and one that would be a little less time consuming. I also understood, especially in graduate school, that the more rigorous a course was, the more I “got out […]