Adaptive Learning: The Future is Up to Us

a group of students around a table

Today we’re excited to welcome back Patricia O’Sullivan, the Program Manager for Externally Funded Academic Innovation Projects at the University of Mississippi. Patti inspired us last year with the University of Mississippi’s work in this area to help their students and improve student success. Today she’s back to Frontiers to consider what’s happening with adaptive […]

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An Introspective Look at WCET’s Own Accessibility Practices, Part II

Photograph showing a pink accessibility sign, which points towards a “Step Free Route.”

Last week, I began to explain what WCET is doing – and potential areas of improvement – about web accessibility, based on different disabilities and barriers that people with those disabilities may encounter as described by The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Check out my first post for background information on what led me to […]

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An Introspective Look at WCET’s Own Accessibility Practices, Part I

Alt text: Icon produced by the Accessible Icon Project showing a person in motion in a wheelchair.

Are your course materials and institutional websites accessible for all learners? Here at Frontiers, we discuss accessibility quite often, but today we have a very practical post that directly reviews content to determine accessibility for all. I’m excited to welcome Rosa Calabrese, WCET’s Digital Designer, who is here to discuss her review of the accessibility […]

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College affordability and the Democratic presidential debates: Is free college higher education’s moonshot?

Photo of the first footprint from mankind on the moon

The Democratic debates are heating up already and they were quite interesting to watch (and it was also interesting to read the social media commentary). Today our new Policy and Planning Consultant, Van Davis, is here to provide an update on the candidate’s higher education plans and how each of these might impact higher technology-enhanced […]

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Addressing the Skills Gap and New Opportunities in Higher Ed

A group of young professionals around a table talking

Next week, WCET hosts it’s annual Leadership Summit. This year the topic is: Workforce Partnerships that Work: Creating Public-Private Partnerships that Serve Students, Institutions, Employers, and Communities. Summit attendees will attend sessions focused on higher education institutions can work with employers to create programming focused on helping students be more career ready and skilled for […]

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Augmented Reality Adventures in Teaching Horticulture

Today we welcome Shannon Riggs, Executive Director of Course Development and Learning Innovation for Oregon State University Ecampus. She is also the author of the forthcoming Thrive Online: A New Approach for College Educators (Stylus, 2019). Shannon shares with us a most fascinating and recent example of innovation — using Augmented Reality to teach Horticulture […]

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Using Telehealth to Reimagine Online Nursing Education at Ohio State

Nurse holding a patient's arm and taking his/her blood pressure.

Today we welcome Susan Neale, senior writer and editor for The Ohio State University College of Nursing. She explores a non-traditional approach to teaching remote nursing students the nuanced skills and tools needed to succeed in the field. Telehealth technology allows nursing students to gain experience with “patients” remotely, and students are prepared to provide […]

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Accidental Adoption: When the Tool Finds You

Picture of man sitting at a table and working on a laptop computer. He is wearing headphones and drinking coffee.

Today we welcome Kenneth Rogers, Enterprise Instructional Technology Specialist with Alamo Colleges District as he shares a story from which all contemporary educators can glean insight. Integrating new technology requires courage and a willingness to embrace change and yet springs tremendous growth and opportunity, just as Kenneth captures in this blog. Enjoy! -Erin Walton – […]

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Negotiated Rulemaking: The Complexity of “Regular and Substantive Interaction”

Image of extremely complicated and complex geometry problem, including numbers, shapes, and graphs.

This is the third in our blog post series on the results of the U.S. Department of Education’s negotiated rulemaking process. The first in the series focused an overview of process, issues, and next steps. The second covered rules for state authorization. Today, we focus on definitions that seem like they should be easy, but […]

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